GFCI Safety Prevention Dallas

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GFCI Safety Prevention For Dallas Homeowners

The electrical systems in our homes are integral in ensuring that we are able to live with all of the modern conveniences that we demand. With that in mind, though, you must remember that electricity can be dangerous if not used properly within the home. These days, there are more safety precautions than ever before, which allows homeowners to use electricity with well-deserved confidence. One such precaution is the GFCI outlet.

This video shows how to protect your home with GFCI.

 

Preventing Electrical Shock with Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters

An electrical shock occurs when your hand or some other part of your body comes in contact with a source of electrical current and your body provides an unintended path and “completes the circuit” between the electric source and ground.   This electrical shock can simply cause a minor jolt, but it can also be fatal!

This unintended path between an electrical source and a grounded surface is called a “Ground Fault,” which means that the electricity or current is leaking or flowing elsewhere than its intended use (such as a hair dryer, electric mixer, lamp or appliance). The path that the current takes to ground is critical. If it’s a piece of equipment, the equipment could be damaged or destroyed. If it’s you, your child or your pet, serious injury, even death, could result.

How much voltage is dangerous?

Electrocution can occur with ordinary household voltages of 110V or less. The real measure of a shock’s intensity is the amount of current or amperage that travels through your body, not necessarily the strength of the source of voltage. In fact, any current over 10 milliamps (0.01 amp) can produce a painful to severe shock; currents between 100 mA and 200 mA (0.1 to 0.2 amp) can be lethal.

Protecting your home and family

A ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) is an electrical device that protects people by detecting potentially dangerous ground faults and quickly shutting off the power. In essence, the GFCI device monitors the balance between the current leaving the GFCI device and the current returning to it. If the difference between the outgoing and returning current is equal to or less that 5 milliamps (5/1000 of 1.0 amp), then everything is OK and the device stays on.  Any imbalance greater than 5 milliamps will disconnect the power and prevent the potentially fatal shock.

Where to Use GFCI Outlets

As a precaution, some homeowners choose to replace all outlets in their homes with GFCI models. This is not required by law, though. It is recommended, and required in many areas, that GFCI outlets are installed in areas where water may be present. This includes those outlets in bathrooms, around kitchen sinks and appliances, and all outdoor outlets. Contact us today to learn more about where you should have GFCI outlets installed in your home.

Safety Tips For GFCI On Your Home

These days, there are more safety precautions than ever before, which allows homeowners to use electricity with well-deserved confidence. One such precaution is the GFCI outlet. Chances are that you have at least a few GFCI outlets installed throughout your home. Call (214) 238-8353 us for your home service and repair needs.

For more related articles and info visit https://www.berkeys.com/category/electrical/

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